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Actor Tchéky Karyo talks about the new series of Baptiste

Tchéky Karyo’s detective from The Missing has returned to the BBC One spin-off series Baptiste

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Tchéky’ a star of over 100 films and both series of The Missing where he starred as the French detective Julien Baptiste, who was diagnosed with a brain tumour in series two.

We caught up with him to talk through the highly-anticipated new series.

“Baptiste is recovering from surgery and he doesn’t want to get drawn back into the police world but while on vacation with his wife, he gets a call from an old colleague and it starts from there. He does realize his own fragility, how he is ‘not the man I used to be’.

“The tumour is part of Baptiste’s story and his character of course; it’s now part of who he is but there is something stronger than him as a character - his work, the way he thinks and acts as a detective.

“Huge credit to the writer of the series, the brothers Harry and Jack Williams, for their imagination, their sensitivity and for allowing me to explore and get into Baptiste as a character. I’m extremely proud of him.

“At first I was anxious to do it because I was afraid by the subject but Tom Shankland’s directing of the first Missing series – the way he worked with me – made me want to jump into the project and it was one of the best experiences I’ve had as an actor. The series has received such recognition and affection in the UK, it’s fantastic and such a gift.

“I have had a personal experience of the effect that a brain tumour diagnosis can have on someone. A friend of mine began to behave differently all of a sudden and it was only when his wife explained to me that he had a brain tumour that I understood why that was.

“All that was needed was some understanding and some patience.”

Tchéky has supported the work we do for several years now, including previous Brain Tumour Awareness Month (BTAM) campaigns.

Baptiste continues this Sunday BBC One at 9pm.

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The aim of The Brain Tumour Charity's Family Days is to provide a fun, relaxing, and supportive experience for families affected by a brain tumour. Our Family Days also provide the opportunity for parents and children to meet others experiencing similar difficulties and share their stories.

My hair is part of my identity, so losing it really affected my confidence.

Read Emeline's story

It was mentioned that the radiotherapy might make me lose my hair, but not how much, as it’s different for everyone.

By session 17, I was half bald, with a ‘reverse monk’ hairstyle. I felt very self-conscious, so took back some control and shaved it all off.

There’s no quick fix to get your confidence back, but you can learn how to accessorise and style yourself. Treat yourself and find ways to make your new look seem purposeful. I bought lots of earrings: dangly, colourful, tasselled – as many colours and styles as I could find!

My friends were very supportive and, if I told them I was having a crisis of confidence, they’d build me back up.

I’ve had so many emotions, but I’ve had the chance to try new styles I wouldn’t have otherwise. Losing your hair will suck, there’s no denying it. But you aren’t alone and there are people you can talk to who understand what it’s like.

Just learn what works for you, trust your instincts and talk to people – that’s the best thing you can do for yourself.

Emeline Gilhooley, diagnosed with a grade 3 brain tumour in 2018 and whose hair has now grown back.

You can find more stories from our community, as well as tips, advice and peer-led support, in ourOnline Support Communities.

The aim of The Brain Tumour Charity's Family Days is to provide a fun, relaxing, and supportive experience for families affected by a brain tumour. Our Family Days also provide the opportunity for parents and children to meet others experiencing similar difficulties and share their stories.
The aim of The Brain Tumour Charity's Family Days is to provide a fun, relaxing, and supportive experience for families affected by a brain tumour. Our Family Days also provide the opportunity for parents and children to meet others experiencing similar difficulties and share their stories.

The aim of The Brain Tumour Charity's Family Days is to provide a fun, relaxing, and supportive experience for families affected by a brain tumour. Our Family Days also provide the opportunity for parents and children to meet others experiencing similar difficulties and share their stories.

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Press office contact details:

Phone: Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm: 01252 237864
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