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Keeping in touch with family and friends

The best thing for my mental health was seeing friends and family for lunch or a drink.

Sarah

Even under ‘normal’ circumstances, people living with a brain tumour can find themselves feeling lonely or isolated. Being able to meet loved ones for face-to-face support – and a hug – can really help. But if you’ve self-isolated or shielded during the coronavirus pandemic, or due to treatment such as radiotherapy, this won’t have been an option.

Keeping in touch with family and friends virtually – by phone, social media or video calls – helps many cope. Organising a weekly virtual quiz can be a fun way to regularly connect. And you may find chatting safely online can also be a real comfort.

In our Facebook Support Groups, you can connect with others who understand in safe and welcoming spaces.

Being active

My daily walk in nature, while listening to some great tunes, has helped me to get through lockdown and remain positive, even though my life is in complete turmoil.

Kerry

Gentle, frequent exercise is known to help relieve stress and improve mood. So, if you’re able to leave your home to exercise, the benefit of a walk outdoors can’t be underestimated.

Media contacts at The Brain Tumour Charity

Press office contact details:

Phone: Mon-Fri, 9am-5pm: 01252 237864
Out of hours media contact: 07990 828385
Email: pressoffice@thebraintumourcharity.org